Pare tribe

Another great experience was going to Pare Mountains, to a village that we could not find on a google maps. We spent only few days there, but it was amazing. We stayed at the only possible accommodation in that area, which was definitely not our favourite. Me being a tourism professional, I usually do not judge when I travel, but seeing a place so badly mismanaged it hurts my head. But the highlight is the option to have a local villager (who speaks English) to show you around on various walks. Our local villager will definitely stay our friend as she was so kind to let us into her world of being from the Pare tribe. We learned about plants, which have medicinal characteristics, how to grow certain foods and spices, met her auntie that was just cooking beans with banana in her little mud house, met an uncle who is the most famous former traditional dancer in the tribe, saw the making of mud bricks, and much more. She also showed us few places from their darker history, such as a rock where they threw children off to avoid being cursed. We also read that it is very unlikely that we will see special places where they store the skulls of their ancestors, but we were lucky enough to be shown two of them. A lot of things they used to do as a tribe, they changed, but they try to keep the good parts of their culture. By the end of the stay we were being greeted like we are one of the fellow villagers. And again people here were welcome and happy that we came, by inviting us to their houses or elders trying to chat with us on the road in Pare tribal language or Swahili. It was amazing.

Annie introducing us to her auntie

Annie introducing us to her auntie